Monthly Archives: December 2013

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books I Read In 2013 (It’s my birthday!)

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

Today is my 27th birthday! 27 is my favorite number, so I’m excited. 🙂 And I’m celebrating by posting my top ten reads of 2013 (also with fireworks and friends later). I refrained from just listing 90% Rick Riordan books. 😉 For this edition, I will count down from ten. Picture link to Goodreads. Here we go!

10) The First Five Pages by Noah Lukeman

I found this book incredibly helpful for editing my manuscript. I highly recommend it. Especially if, like me, you can identify problem areas in your writing but aren’t exactly sure how to best go about remedying them. 

9) Nobody by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

This book had such an intriguing setup. I loved the allusions to other literature and the character development between the two main characters.

8) Beta by Rachel Cohn

Such a fascinating book! The directions the story took were really brave and thought-provoking and I’m thrilled that the sequel finally has a release date, even if it’s not until September!

7) Mermother by Elizabeth Jane Wolfe

A really interesting new take on mermaid mythology that doesn’t shy away from the difficult questions of biology that mermaids present. I’m greatly looking forward to the sequel. 

6) If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan

It may be premature of me to list this one, since I haven’t quite finished it yet, but I only have 40 pages left and so far it’s just amazing. The story is gripping and definitely informative about Iranian culture, but in a way that blends seamlessly with the narrative. Stunning.

5) Queen of Kings by Maria Dahvana Headley

This book completely exceeded my expectations. Lush and descriptive and thrilling and full of myth and history and character. Even though it’s adult fiction, which I generally avoid, I absolutely loved it.

4) Ashes on the Waves By Mary Lindsay

Okay, so I knew I would love this the minute I heard it existed. That didn’t make it any less amazing. If anything, it actually managed to exceed my exponentially high expectations. Poe forever.

3) The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan

All of the demigods finally met! Epic character interaction ensued! God I love these characters. 

2) The Indigo Spell by Richelle Mead

This series just keeps better and better. I loved seeing Sydney working with her magic more in this one and of course Adrian was charming as usual. I STILL need to read The Fiery Heart so I can anxiously await Silver Shadows. 🙂

1) The House of Hades by Rick Riordan

We have a winner! Even though the demigods were separated, there still managed to be even more character development and interaction in this one. I loved every line, I really did. I can’t wait for The Blood of Olympus to come out in October!

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What do you think? Good choices? Did you read any of these this year? Leave me a comment!

Happy New Year!


Stacking The Shelves: Santa Edition

Stacking the Shelves

Stacking The Shelves is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews,

where bloggers show off all the pretties they’ve obtained that week.

Merry Christmas! (Also, Happy Yule, Hannukah, Kwanza and Boxing Day!) I hope that you all had a wonderful holiday(s) and that Santa fulfilled all your wildest bookish desires!

This is my first Stacking The Shelves, and since before I was even born my parents have been giving me books for Christmas (yes, my mother confirmed this – I was born on New Year’s Eve, so my parents bought me some pre-birth gifts – we’ve never been big on having to celebrate holidays on the actual holiday), it seems like the perfect time to participate. Santa gifted me with book goodies galore, so I hope you enjoying taking a peek!

Here’s what they looked like after I unwrapped them:

And here they are all stacked up:

So pretty!

Divergent by Veronica Roth

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago world, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue–Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is–she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles alongside her fellow initiates to live out the choice they have made. Together they must undergo extreme physical tests of endurance and intense psychological simulations, some with devastating consequences. As initiation transforms them all, Tris must determine who her friends really are–and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes exasperating boy fits into the life she’s chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she’s kept hidden from everyone because she’s been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers unrest and growing conflict that threaten to unravel her seemingly perfect society, Tris also learns that her secret might help her save the ones she loves . . . or it might destroy her.

My step-mom had read this and says it was really good (she has great taste in books and our preferences are similar), and my edition has 50 pages of bonus material! So excited to dive into this one before the movie comes out.

The Diviners by Libba Bray

Do you believe there are ghosts and demons and Diviners among us? 

Evie O’Neill has been exiled from her boring old hometown and shipped off to the bustling streets of New York City–and she is pos-i-tute-ly ecstatic. It’s 1926, and New York is filled with speakeasies, Ziegfeld girls, and rakish pickpockets. The only catch is that she has to live with her uncle Will and his unhealthy obsession with the occult.
Evie worries he’ll discover her darkest secret: a supernatural power that has only brought her trouble so far. But when the police find a murdered girl branded with a cryptic symbol and Will is called to the scene, Evie realizes her gift could help catch a serial killer.
As Evie jumps headlong into a dance with a murderer, other stories unfurled in the city that never sleeps. A young man named Memphis is caught between two worlds. A chorus girl named Theta is running from her past. A student named Jericho hides a shocking secret. And unknown to all, something dark and evil has awakened….
Printz Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Libba Bray opens a brand-new historical series with The Diviners, where the glittering surface of the Roaring Twenties hides a mystical horror creeping across the country.

Yay more Libba Bray! I am still in serious withdrawl from The Sweet Far Thing (my happy-dance over receiving this book made my step-mom inquire about the Gemma Doyle series so now I think she may read it. Awesome.), and I’ve no doubt this book will be wonderful and magical as well.

Mermaid by Carolyn Turgeon

Princess Margrethe has been hidden away while her kingdom is at war. One gloomy, windswept morning, as she stands in a convent garden overlooking the icy sea, she witnesses a miracle: a glittering mermaid emerging from the waves, a nearly drowned man in her arms. By the time Margrethe reaches the shore, the mermaid has disappeared into the sea. As Margrethe nurses the handsome stranger back to health, she learns that not only is he a prince, he is also the son of her father’s greatest rival. Sure that the mermaid brought this man to her for a reason, Margrethe devises a plan to bring peace to her kingdom.

Meanwhile, the mermaid Princess Lenia longs to return to the human man she carried to safety. She is willing to trade her home, her voice, and even her health for legs and the chance to win his heart…

A surprising take on the classic tale, Mermaid is the story of two women with everything to lose. It will make you think twice about the fairy tale you heard as a child, keeping you in suspense until the very last page.

I met Carolyn Turgeon this summer and have wanted to read this book ever since. I love retellings, and the passages she read out of this one were gorgeous. 

Steampunk Poe by Zdenko Basic and Manuel Sumberac

If you combined clockwork gears, parasols, and air balloons with Edgar Allan Poe, what would you get? Steampunk: Poe! This is the first collection ever of Poe stories illustrated with the influence of steampunk. Running Press Teens has selected some of the most popular, thrilling, and memorable stories and poems by the classic 19th century American writer whose literary talent continues to open the mind to countless interpretations.Every Poe story and poems is fully illustrated with steampunk-inspired art—from 1920s aviation gear to elaborate musical instruments—creating a fresh perspective on his work containing bizarre characters of madmen and mystery. Just in time for Halloween,Steampunk: Poe is the perfect classic horror choice with a haunting steampunk twist!

It’s so beautiful! The illustrations are so wonderfully eerie. I love how they complement the text.

The Once and Future King by T.H. White

The Once and Future King is T.H. White’s masterful retelling of the saga of King Arthur, a fantasy classic as legendary as Excalibur and Camelot, and a poignant story of adventure, romance and magic that has enchanted readers for generations.

Once upon a time, a young boy called “Wart” was tutored by a magician named Merlyn in preparation for a future he couldn’t possibly imagine. A future in which he would ally himself with the greatest knights, love a legendary queen and unite a country dedicated to chivalrous values. A future that would see him crowned and known for all time as Arthur, King of the Britons.

During Arthur’s reign, the kingdom of Camelot was founded to cast enlightenment on the Dark Ages, while the knights of the Round Table embarked on many a noble quest. But Merlyn foresaw the treachery that awaited his liege: the forbidden love between Queen Guinevere and Lancelot, the wicked plots of Arthur’s half-sister Morgause, and the hatred she fostered in Mordred that would bring an end to the king’s dreams for Britain—and to the king himself.

Yay! So excited to read this. I love the Arthurian legends but I’ve actually never read this one. Now I can rectify that. 

Ruby Red by Kersten Gier

Although I had never seen him before, I recognized him immediately. I’d have known his voice anywhere. This was the guy I’d seen on my last journey back in time.

Or more precisely, the one who’d kissed my doppelganger while I was hiding behind the curtain in disbelief.

Sixteen-year-old Gwen lives with her extended – and rather eccentric – family in an exclusive London neighborhood. In spite of her ancestors’ peculiar history, she’s had a relatively normal life so far. The time-traveling gene that runs like a secret thread through the female half of the family is supposed to have skipped over Gwen, so she hasn’t been introduced to “the mysteries,” and can spend her time hanging out with her best friend, Lesly. It comes as an unwelcome surprise when she starts taking sudden, uncontrolled leaps into the past.

She’s totally unprepared for time travel, not to mention all that comes with it: fancy clothes, archaic manners, a mysterious secret society, and Gideon, her time-traveling counterpart. He’s obnoxious, a know-it-all, and possibly the best-looking guy she’s seen in any century . . .

Secret Edwardian time-travel societies. Definite must-read.

Solstice Wood by Patricia A. McKillip

The World Fantasy Award-winning author’s foray into the modern world-now in paperback.

No stranger to the realms of myth and magic, World Fantasy Award-winning author Patricia A. McKillip presents her first contemporary fantasy in many years-a tale of the tangled lives mere mortals lead, when they turn their eyes from the beauty and mystery that lie just outside of the everyday…

When bookstore owner Sylvia Lynn returns to her childhood home in upstate New York, she meets the Fiber Guild-a group of local women who meet to knit, embroider, and sew-and learns why her grandmother watches her so closely. A primitive power exists in the forest, a force the Fiber Guild seeks to bind in its stitches and weavings. And Sylvia is no stranger to the woods.

A McKillip for Christmas! Her books are so amazing. I know this one will be too. 

Anathem by Neal Stephenson

Anathem, the latest invention by the New York Times bestselling author of Cryptonomicon and The Baroque Cycle, is a magnificent creation: a work of great scope, intelligence, and imagination that ushers readers into a recognizable—yet strangely inverted—world.

Fraa Erasmas is a young avout living in the Concent of Saunt Edhar, a sanctuary for mathematicians, scientists, and philosophers, protected from the corrupting influences of the outside “saecular” world by ancient stone, honored traditions, and complex rituals. Over the centuries, cities and governments have risen and fallen beyond the concent’s walls. Three times during history’s darkest epochs violence born of superstition and ignorance has invaded and devastated the cloistered mathic community. Yet the avout have always managed to adapt in the wake of catastrophe, becoming out of necessity even more austere and less dependent on technology and material things. And Erasmas has no fear of the outside—the Extramuros—for the last of the terrible times was long, long ago.

Now, in celebration of the week-long, once-in-a-decade rite of Apert, the fraas and suurs prepare to venture beyond the concent’s gates—at the same time opening them wide to welcome the curious “extras” in. During his first Apert as a fraa, Erasmas eagerly anticipates reconnecting with the landmarks and family he hasn’t seen since he was “collected.” But before the week is out, both the existence he abandoned and the one he embraced will stand poised on the brink of cataclysmic change.

Powerful unforeseen forces jeopardize the peaceful stability of mathic life and the established ennui of the Extramuros—a threat that only an unsteady alliance of saecular and avout can oppose—as, one by one, Erasmas and his colleagues, teachers, and friends are summoned forth from the safety of the concent in hopes of warding off global disaster. Suddenly burdened with a staggering responsibility, Erasmas finds himself a major player in a drama that will determine the future of his world—as he sets out on an extraordinary odyssey that will carry him to the most dangerous, inhospitable corners of the planet . . . and beyond.

My husband got this one but it looks interesting so I may read it too some time. 🙂

Thank you so much Santa! My sweet, helpful little Captain Jack and I are all-Christmas-ed out and going to sleep now! Thanks for reading!


Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books I Wouldn’t Mind Santa Bringing Me

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

1) The Once and Future King by T.H. White

The Once and Future King is T.H. White’s masterful retelling of the saga of King Arthur, a fantasy classic as legendary as Excalibur and Camelot, and a poignant story of adventure, romance and magic that has enchanted readers for generations.

Once upon a time, a young boy called “Wart” was tutored by a magician named Merlyn in preparation for a future he couldn’t possibly imagine. A future in which he would ally himself with the greatest knights, love a legendary queen and unite a country dedicated to chivalrous values. A future that would see him crowned and known for all time as Arthur, King of the Britons.

During Arthur’s reign, the kingdom of Camelot was founded to cast enlightenment on the Dark Ages, while the knights of the Round Table embarked on many a noble quest. But Merlyn foresaw the treachery that awaited his liege: the forbidden love between Queen Guinevere and Lancelot, the wicked plots of Arthur’s half-sister Morgause, and the hatred she fostered in Mordred that would bring an end to the king’s dreams for Britain—and to the king himself.

I’ve been needing to read this one for a while now. I’d love to have a nice, pretty copy of it. 

2) Brian Froud’s Faerielands: Something Rich and Strange by Patricia A. McKillip

They have lived among us for centuries — distant, separate, just out of sight. They fill our myths, our legends, and the stories we tell our children in the dark of night. They come from the air, from water, from earth, and from fire. What are these creatures that enjoin out imagination? Faeries. Something Rich and Strange creates a faerie story that’s not to be missed: Megan is an artist who draws seascapes. Jonah owns a shop devoted to treasures from the deep. Their lives, so strongly touched by the ocean, become forever intertwined when enchanting people of the sea lure them further into the underwater world — and away from each other.

Just look at this gorgeousness. I’ve read the novel version and it was amazing (as is everything McKillip writes) and this version is illustrated by Brian Froud. Seriously amazing combination, I’ve no doubt.

3) Steampunk Poe illustrated by Zdenko Basic & Manuel Sumberac

If you combined clockwork gears, parasols, and air balloons with Edgar Allan Poe, what would you get? Steampunk: Poe! This is the first collection ever of Poe stories illustrated with the influence of steampunk. Running Press Teens has selected some of the most popular, thrilling, and memorable stories and poems by the classic 19th century American writer whose literary talent continues to open the mind to countless interpretations.Every Poe story and poems is fully illustrated with steampunk-inspired art—from 1920s aviation gear to elaborate musical instruments—creating a fresh perspective on his work containing bizarre characters of madmen and mystery. Just in time for Halloween, Steampunk: Poe is the perfect classic horror choice with a haunting steampunk twist!

It’s Edgar Allan Poe with Steampunk illustrations! What could be more awesome?

4) The Asylum For Wayward Victorian Girls by Emilie Autumn

Presenting Emilie Autumn’s long awaited autobiographical, reality-bending thriller, “The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls.” This beautifully bound hardcover volume measures 8″ x 11.5″ and clocks in at a massive 274 fully illustrated pages. Positively packed with hand-written memoirs, photos, and paintings, this profoundly empowering epic not only deserves a place on your tea table, it is also one of the most complete accounts of bipolar disorder ever penned, and will take readers behind the doors of both modern day psych ward and Victorian insane asylum in this true life horror tale of madness, murder, and medical experimentation.

But reader beware: It’s much easier to get into the Asylum than it is to get out.

Emilie Autumn is so, so amazing but it would pretty much take Santa to make this appear under my tree, since it’s currently unavailable and when it was available it was $75. Some day…

5) Solstice Wood by Patricia A. McKillip

The World Fantasy Award-winning author’s foray into the modern world-now in paperback.

No stranger to the realms of myth and magic, World Fantasy Award-winning author Patricia A. McKillip presents her first contemporary fantasy in many years-a tale of the tangled lives mere mortals lead, when they turn their eyes from the beauty and mystery that lie just outside of the everyday…

When bookstore owner Sylvia Lynn returns to her childhood home in upstate New York, she meets the Fiber Guild-a group of local women who meet to knit, embroider, and sew-and learns why her grandmother watches her so closely. A primitive power exists in the forest, a force the Fiber Guild seeks to bind in its stitches and weavings. And Sylvia is no stranger to the woods.

Oh look! Another McKillip! This book is the sequel to “Winter Rose”, one of my very favorite McKillips. It’s contemporary fantasy, so it’s different from her usual fare, but I am eager to see how she does in the genre, and of course I’m all about sequels to books I love. 

6.) Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

Darkness never dies.

Hunted across the True Sea, haunted by the lives she took on the Fold, Alina must try to make a life with Mal in an unfamiliar land. She finds starting new is not easy while keeping her identity as the Sun Summoner a secret. She can’t outrun her past or her destiny for long.

The Darkling has emerged from the Shadow Fold with a terrifying new power and a dangerous plan that will test the very boundaries of the natural world. With the help of a notorious privateer, Alina returns to the country she abandoned, determined to fight the forces gathering against Ravka. But as her power grows, Alina slips deeper into the Darkling’s game of forbidden magic, and farther away from Mal. Somehow, she will have to choose between her country, her power, and the love she always thought would guide her–or risk losing everything to the oncoming storm.

I already have Shadow and Bone but I need this one so I can read them both back to back and then cry until the last one comes out in June. Sometimes you just know you’re going to love a series, even if you haven’t read it yet.

7) Witchstruck by Victoria Lamb

Meg Lytton has always known of her dark and powerful gift. Raised a student of the old magick by her Aunt Jane, casting the circle to see visions of the future and concocting spells from herbs and bones has always been as natural to Meg as breathing. But there has never been a more dangerous time to practise the craft, for it is 1554, and the sentence for any woman branded a witch is hanging, or burning at the stake.

Sent to the ruined, isolated palace of Woodstock to serve the disgraced Elizabeth, daughter of Henry VIII and half-sister of Queen Mary, Meg discovers her skills are of interest to the outcast princess, who is desperate to know if she will ever claim the throne. But Meg’s existence becomes more dangerous every day, with the constant threat of exposure by the ruthless witchfinder Marcus Dent, and the arrival of a young Spanish priest, Alejandro de Castillo, to whom Meg is irresistibly drawn – despite their very different attitudes to her secret.

Thrilling and fast-paced, this is the first unputdownable story in a bewitching new series.

Witches + Elizabethan (well okay, pre-Elizabethan) England = must have. A story like this has been on my “please, somebody write this” wishlist for years.

8.) The Fiery Heart by Richelle Mead

Sydney Sage is an Alchemist, one of a group of humans who dabble in magic and serve to bridge the worlds of humans and vampires. They protect vampire secrets – and human lives.

In The Indigo Spell, Sydney was torn between the Alchemist way of life and what her heart and gut were telling her to do. And in one breathtaking moment that Richelle Mead fans will never forget, she made a decision that shocked even her. . . .

But the struggle isn’t over for Sydney. As she navigates the aftermath of her life-changing decision, she still finds herself pulled in too many directions at once. Her sister Zoe has arrived, and while Sydney longs to grow closer to her, there’s still so much she must keep secret. Working with Marcus has changed the way she views the Alchemists, and Sydney must tread a careful path as she harnesses her profound magical ability to undermine the way of life she was raised to defend. Consumed by passion and vengeance, Sydney struggles to keep her secret life under wraps as the threat of exposure — and re-education — looms larger than ever.

Pulses will race throughout this smoldering fourth installment in the New York Times bestselling Bloodlines series, where no secret is safe.

Santa knows how much I need this. I think everyone else on the planet does too at this point. 

 

10) Antigoddess by Kendare Blake

The Goddess War begins in Antigoddess, the first installment of the new series by acclaimed author of Anna Dressed in Blood, Kendare Blake.

Old Gods never die…

Or so Athena thought. But then the feathers started sprouting beneath her skin, invading her lungs like a strange cancer, and Hermes showed up with a fever eating away his flesh. So much for living a quiet eternity in perpetual health.

Desperately seeking the cause of their slow, miserable deaths, Athena and Hermes travel the world, gathering allies and discovering enemies both new and old. Their search leads them to Cassandra—an ordinary girl who was once an extraordinary prophetess, protected and loved by a god.

These days, Cassandra doesn’t involve herself in the business of gods—in fact, she doesn’t even know they exist. But she could be the key in a war that is only just beginning.

Because Hera, the queen of the gods, has aligned herself with other of the ancient Olympians, who are killing off rivals in an attempt to prolong their own lives. But these anti-gods have become corrupted in their desperation to survive, horrific caricatures of their former glory. Athena will need every advantage she can get, because immortals don’t just flicker out.

Every one of them dies in their own way. Some choke on feathers. Others become monsters. All of them rage against their last breath.

The Goddess War is about to begin.

Again, I can tell already that I will love this. Greek mythology with a decidedly dark twist (not that Greek mythology isn’t dark to begin with), and some really disturbing yet beautiful imagery.

 

10) The Girl of Fire & Thorns by Rae Carson

Once a century, one person is chosen for greatness.
Elisa is the chosen one.

But she is also the younger of two princesses, the one who has never done anything remarkable. She can’t see how she ever will.

Now, on her sixteenth birthday, she has become the secret wife of a handsome and worldly king—a king whose country is in turmoil. A king who needs the chosen one, not a failure of a princess.

And he’s not the only one who seeks her. Savage enemies seething with dark magic are hunting her. A daring, determined revolutionary thinks she could be his people’s savior. And he looks at her in a way that no man has ever looked at her before. Soon it is not just her life, but her very heart that is at stake.

Elisa could be everything to those who need her most. If the prophecy is fulfilled. If she finds the power deep within herself. If she doesn’t die young.

Most of the chosen do.

So I won “The Crown of Embers” and “The Biter Kingdom” (separately) and they look really sad on my bookshelf without this one. Once I have this first installment I can actually read them all! (I don’t believe in reading a series out of order).

So hard to narrow it down to only ten, but I’ll be happy if Santa gets me just one. 🙂  Books are the best presents.

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Merry Christmas everyone! I hope Santa fulfills all your reading wishes! Thanks for checking out my post. 🙂


Review: The Sea of Monsters (Percy Jackson & The Olympians #2)

The Sea of Monsters

by Rick Riordan

Genre: Middle Grade Fantasy

Series: Percy Jackson and the Olympians #2

Source: Purchased

Book Summary:

Percy Jackson’s seventh-grade year has been surprisingly quiet. Not a single monster has set foot on his New York prep-school campus. But when an innocent game of dodgeball among Percy and his classmates turns into a death match against an ugly gang of cannibal giants, things get . . . well, ugly. And the unexpected arrival of Percy’s friend Annabeth brings more bad news: the magical borders that protect Camp Half-Blood have been poisoned by a mysterious enemy, and unless a cure is found, the only safe haven for demigods will be destroyed.

In this fresh, funny, and hugely anticipated follow up to The Lightning Thief, Percy and his friends must journey into the Sea of Monsters to save their beloved camp. But first, Percy will discover a stunning new secret about his family—one that makes him question whether being claimed as Poseidon’s son is an honor or simply a cruel joke.

book thoughts

This book was so much fun. I get worried when I see a sequel is shorter than a first in a series. I think I associate it with the book being hastily produced or otherwise rushed (I probably have this issue because Harry Potter 5 is my all-time favorite and then HP6 came out and was way too short and felt rushed. I think it gave me a complex or something.)

Anyway. This book cured me of said complex. It didn’t need to be longer. A lot happens. A lot happens that doesn’t necessarily seem to be advancing the overall plot thread of the series, but this is only because we can’t see the whole picture. When we do…wow.

Percy and his friends actually go to the Sea of Monsters (which, like all ancient Greek stuff, has relocated to the reigning Western power, America, and so is now located – where else? – in the Bermuda Triangle), dwelling place of all those fun people like Circe, the sirens, and man – or satyr – eating cyclopses. And speaking of cyclops, I just love Tyson. He is the best.

We get to meet more Gods, which is always fun. Being such a fan of mythology as I am, it’s awesome to always be wondering who is going to pop up next, and still often end up surprised because there is just SO much material for the author to work with. And even when I can guess where things are headed, well…it’s still fun because then I feel clever. 🙂

There were some very emotional moments that I wasn’t expected, but was pleasantly surprised. We see farther into Annabeth’s character and she really comes into her own, as her own hero, bot Percy’s sidekick. Even Grover really grows, and though he doesn’t believe it himself, he is MUCH more than Percy’s sidekick. Even mean-girl Ares camper Clarisse is humanized.

We also learn that monsters are responsible for chain restaurants. What more could you ask for?

Oh, and p.s. from my inner 9-year-old self: OMG FISH PONIES!

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I’ve Been Interviewed!

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The lovely Caroline of The Attic has featured Rose Shadow Ink in her Behind The Blogger segment!

It’s the perfect Yule present for me. 🙂

Please go check it out here!

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